• CHS Course Descriptions

    English Courses 

    9th and 10th grade students are required to take an English course in both the fall and spring semesters unless otherwise designated by the principal. 

    Technical Reading and Writing  

    Students begin to explore the thematic topic of “The Power of Language” through the reading of short stories, poetry, and plays such as Romeo and Juliet. Students will engage in writing workshops that focus on literary analysis and narrative writing tasks. Language studies focus on foundational grammar skills and application.   

    English I  

    Following Technical Reading & Writing, English I students will continue their exploration of the thematic topic of “The Power of Language” in many different mediums from multiple genres. In the second semester, students will focus on speaking and listening standards through plays and poetry.  Students will analyze and write arguments, and they will continue their focus on literary analysis studying various novel excerpts as well as To Kill a Mockingbird. Students will engage with a rigorous examination of conventions and usage.   

    Technical Writing  

    Technical Writing students explore “Persuasion Across Cultures” and focus on evidence-based writing in response to both fiction and nonfiction texts. Students read various argumentative texts as well as the novel Things Fall Apart. In writing workshops, students write arguments and literary analysis while moving through the revision process to strengthen their writing skills. They also practice research skills and develop English usage and conventions to improve writing and practice for the ACT.  

    English II  

    Students continue looking at texts through the lens of “Persuasion Across Cultures” by studying various short stories and nonfiction texts. They write short stories, conduct research, and create synthesis arguments.  Students also explore poetry as well as the genre of drama through the study of Antigone. Writing is improved through responsive writing workshops and the revision process as students practice a variety of writing skills including literary analysis, while speaking and listening are addressed through performance.  

    English III  

    English III students explore the theme of “The American Dream” through complex fiction and nonfiction texts from specific American literary periods. Students examine historical documents, poetry, essays, plays such as The Crucible, and novels such as Their Eyes Were Watching God. Since the ACT is a state requirement for all juniors, this course focuses on both ACT English and ACT Reading skills. Students engage in recursive writing workshops, composing original synthesis essays as well as  literary analyses. 

    English IV  

    In addition to preparing for the ACT, students will engage in analysis of primarily British Literature –with a focus on two “anchor” texts: Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Orwell’s 1984. Students will also produce analytical essays in which they show how the various literary elements used by Shakespeare, Orwell, and others reinforce basic themes and motifs. Students will also be required to produce expository, compare and contrast, and argumentative essays. These challenges will prepare students for a required research paper, an argumentative, four-to-six page paper. Finally, an on-going grammar review will prepare student for both the ACT and the challenges of college-essay writing.  

    Business English  

    This class covers reading, writing, and comprehension skills necessary for the workplace. Students will develop skills in reading and understanding common workplace documents. Students will also learn to analyze workplace graphics such as tables, graphs, charts, diagrams, flow charts, floor plans, and instrument gauges.  

    English Language and Composition — Advanced Placement / Dual Enrollment   

    Prerequisite:  English III  

    Dual Enrollment Credit: English Composition I (ENGL 1010) 

    This course engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing.  

    English Literature and Composition — Advanced Placement / Dual Enrollment  

    Dual Enrollment Credit: English Composition II (ENGL 1020) 

     This course engages students in becoming skilled readers of a variety of fiction-genres: poetry, novels, and drama. A focus on analytical writing will seek to help students sharpen their reading-comprehension skills. Students will be challenged to produce analytical essays, which identify various literary devices (images, tone, diction, etc.) and which demonstrate how these various devices are used to convey a contextual/historic philosophy and/or idea.  

    English V 

    Prerequisite: English IV 

    English V is a course for seniors only who have completed English I-IV successfully. It is structured to resemble a freshman college English class and uses a college text. It is designed to equip the college-bound students more intensely with skills and techniques for success in college. The emphasis here is on the different types of essays and responding to literature, with grammar lessons concentrating on errors seniors still need to correct before college. The course also includes ACT preparatory work. 

     

    Mathematics 

    9th and 10th grade students are required to take a mathematics course in both the fall and spring semesters. 

     Technical Math  

    This course gives an in-depth look at linear concepts with an introduction to quadratic expressions. Linear concepts covered in the course include expressions, equations, inequalities, slope, average rate of change, graphing, and systems of equations and inequalities. 

    Algebra I 

    This course includes the study of linear, quadratic, exponential, and parent functions. Topics included are linear vs. non-linear, factoring, solving quadratic equations, applications of quadratic functions, exponential growth and decay, shifts of parent functions, domain and range, and measures of central tendency. 

    Math Essentials 

    Prerequisite: Algebra I 

    Math Essentials includes the study of geometric figures, definitions, and proofs; segment and angle measurement; distance and midpoint formulas; parallel and perpendicular lines; translations, reflections, and rotations; and properties of triangles and triangle congruence. 

    Geometry 

    Prerequisite: Algebra I 

    This courses offer students an inductive approach to geometrical concepts. The topics covered are geometric patterns and puzzles, reasoning and proof, parallel and perpendicular relationships, triangles and quadrilaterals, similarity and trigonometry, area, surface area, polyhedral and volume, circles and spheres, and transformations. The purchase of a scientific calculator, ruler, protractor, and compass are suggested for these courses. 

    Algebra II 

    Prerequisites: Algebra I and Geometry 

    This course is needed for college mathematics. It includes a study of functions, polynomial equations and inequalities, rational equations and inequalities, radicals and the complex number system, quadratic and higher order polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and conic sections.  The purchase of a scientific calculator is suggested. 

    Financial Literacy 

    Prerequisites:  Algebra I 

    This course is designed to develop the ability to solve real world problems in order to become productive citizens and workers in a technological society. Problem-solving applications will be used to analyze and solve business problems. 

    Business Math 

    This class teaches the critical thinking, mathematical reasoning, and problem solving techniques for students to be  successful  in  situations that occur in today’s workplace. Lessons are aimed at strengthening core mathematics skills to apply to work-related problems 

    Algebra III 

    Prerequisite: Algebra II 

    Algebra III includes the study of ratio and proportion, probability, statistics, linear functions, quadratic functions, and topics in geometry, among other math topics. 

    Algebra III Dual Enrollment 

    Prerequisite: Algebra II 

    Dual Enrollment: College Algebra (Math 1300) 

     College Algebra covers topics in algebra including solving and graphing equations and inequalities and working with functions including quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It also covers complex numbers as roots for quadratic equations. 

    Adv. Math: Functions and Statistics 

    Prerequisite: Algebra II 

    This course includes a study of mathematical functions, power functions, and polynomial functions, rational function, radical functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, matrices, univariate statistics, and bivariate statistics. 

    Adv. Mathematics: Pre-Calculus  

    Prerequisite: Advanced Math Functions and Statistics 

    This course includes a study of trigonometric functions, additional topics in trigonometry, sequences and series, and conic sections and parametric equations. 

    Calculus 

    Prerequisite: Advanced Math: Pre-Calculus 

    Calculus serves as preparation for college calculus. It includes the study of functions, graphs, limits, and continuity, differentiation and integration techniques of algebraic and trigonometric functions, maxima and minima, plus related rates. 

    Calculus — Advanced Placement 

    Grade level: 12 Prerequisite: Calculus 

    This course includes the study and application  of  limits  and  continuity as they are related to instantaneous rates of change, differentiation of inverse trigonometrics, logarithmic and exponential functions, application of derivatives in optimization problems, linearization models and related rate problems, application of definite integrals in approximating areas and volumes of solids with known cross-sections. 

      

     

    Science 

    Physical Science 

    Physical Science involves the investigation of forces, motion, work and energy, the structure and properties of matter, chemical reactions in a laboratory setting, and the interrelationship of matter and energy. An exploration of the nature and history of science and related careers is included. This course is the basis for further study of physics, chemistry and other sciences. Mathematical skills through the pre-algebra level are used in problem solving. 

    Chemistry 

    Prerequisites: Biology I, Physical Science or its equivalent, and Algebra II or concurrent enrollment in Algebra II 

    Chemistry I focuses on the properties and reaction of matter with emphasis on real world applications. Topics of concentration include scientific measurements, symbolic representation, properties and structure of matter, chemical reactions and relationships between energy and matter. These concepts are developed through inquiry-based labs, demonstrations, problem solving, and other interactive activities. 

    Biology I 

    Biology I explores the characteristics and life cycles of organisms and explains their relationships to each other and their environments. Topics of concentration include: cellular biology, the molecular basis of heredity, biological evolution, energy relationships within organisms and ecosystems, organization of living systems and contemporary health issues. The development of these concepts is supported by inquiry and laboratory based instruction. 

    Biology II: Human Anatomy and Physiology 

    Prerequisites: Chemistry 

    The Human Anatomy and Physiology course provides a detailed study of the human body systems specifically focusing on structure and function. Students explore advanced topics through research, laboratory techniques and seminar discussion. An additional focus is on medical career development. 

    Biology II — Advanced Placement / Dual Enrollment 

    Prerequisite:  Chemistry 

    Dual Enrollment – General Biology I (BIOL 1100) 

    Biology II is designed for the student who has a strong interest in biology and may be considering a career in a health field. Students explore advanced topics selected from cellular biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, genetics, microbiology, evolution, behavior, ecology, plant and animal anatomy and physiology. Research and advanced laboratory techniques are emphasized. 

    Chemistry II  

    Prerequisites: Chemistry I 

    Chemistry II is designed to enrich and enhance the study of basic chemistry. The major topics include: chemistry thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, solubility, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and organic chemistry. This course parallels the material covered in an entry level college level course. Lab experiences and problem-solving are used in making contemporary applications in biochemistry and industrial processes. 

    Chemistry II Dual Enrollment 

    Prerequisites: Chemistry I 

    Dual Enrollment: General Chemistry I (CHEM 1100) 

     This course introduces the fundamentals of chemistry including properties of matter, nomenclature, structure of elements and compounds, laws, theories, general principles, and problem-solving techniques. 

    Environmental Science 

    Prerequisites: Biology I and Physical Science or its equivalent 

     Environmental Science provides a balanced approach to scientific principles and societal applications. These include ecological systems and interactions, resources and resource management, environmental awareness and protection. This integrated study is designed to develop an informed citizenry by providing a learning model which progresses through knowledge, understanding, appreciation and stewardship. 

     Environmental Science 

    Prerequisites: Biology I and Physical Science or its equivalent 

    Dual Enrollment: Environmental Science (BIOL 22010) 

     This environmental biology course addresses ecosystems, population, major environmental pollutants, and human health effects. 

     Physics 

    Prerequisites: Chemistry and Advanced Math: Functions and Statistics (or current enrollment in Advanced Math: Functions and Statistics) 

    Physics includes the topics of force and motion, forms of energy and their transformations, and the conservation and interactions of  energy and matter. Contemporary applications are illustrated through laboratory procedures. Mathematical skills through the advanced mathematics level are used in problem solving. 

     

     

    Social Studies 

    Civics  

    Civics is a survey course designed to examine the foundations of the United States government, formation of the Constitution, the branches of government, political parties, elections, and economic systems. Students explore the goal of a “more perfect union” and the role of the individual in the decisions of that union.  They will gain insight into these topics through analysis of historical texts, cartoons, and graphs.  

    U.S. History  

    US History is a survey of our country’s history from the Industrial Revolution through the present presidential administration.  Students explore the evolution of the American identity and its role in the global community.  Students must use sources regularly to learn content; make connections among people, events, and ideas across time and place; and express informed opinions using evidence from sources and outside knowledge. 

    U.S. History — Advanced Placement  

    Prerequisites: B average in U.S. History  

    This class is taught as a college class, using a college textbook. It examines, in depth, a broad body of historical knowledge. Students will demonstrate an understanding of historical chronology; use historical data to support an argument or position; differentiate between historical schools of thought; interpret and apply data from original documents, including cartoons, graphs, letters, etc.; effectively use analytical skills of evaluation, cause and effect, comparison and contrast; and work effectively with others to produce products and solve problems.  

    World History  

    World History is a survey course covering major world events from Imperialism to present, including World Wars I and II and the Cold War. Students will examine how these events impacted different parts of the world and shaped our world today by exploring the impact of the movement of good, ideas, and people over time; causes and global consequences of international conflict; and major sources of social tension, conflict, and economic disparity in different parts of the world.  Students must use sources regularly to learn content; make connections among people, events, and ideas across time and place; and express informed opinions using evidence from sources and outside knowledge. 

    World Geography  

    World Geography is a physical and cultural approach to the study of nations. It covers differing physical environments and man’s adaptation to them. It also examines the various social and economic activities of people, their demographics, and migration.  

      

    Human Geography — Advanced Placement  

    The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice.  

    Psychology — Advanced Placement  

    The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice. The course objectives are outlined by the College Board.  

     

     

    Foreign Language 

    Students must schedule 2 courses of the same foreign language in their junior or senior year to complete the TOPS University diploma. 

    Latin I 

    Latin I is designed to introduce and develop basic skills in the Latin language and to encourage an appreciation for the cultures of the Greeks and Romans. Knowledge of Latin is extended through the skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Grammar and vocabulary are emphasized. 

    Latin II 

    Latin II is a continuation of Latin I skills in the four areas of communication: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The subject content of this course is organized to teach students to learn Latin by reading, comprehending, and discovering the shapes of words and the structures of phrases, clauses, and paragraphs. Knowledge and appreciation of Greek and Roman cultures are continued. 

      

    Latin III and Latin IV 

    Latin III and Latin IV offer continued development and application of cultural appreciation and language skills. Students read and translate texts of ancient authors such as Cicero, Virgil, and Seneca. 

    Spanish I 

    This course is designed to introduce the student to basic vocabulary, speech patterns, and structures of the Spanish language via the four communicative skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing). Emphasis is placed on the relationship between vocabulary and language structures and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Comparisons are made between the English and Spanish languages, and American culture and various Spanish/Hispanic cultures. Course content is presented and reinforced through projects, media, and technology. The textbook is supplemented with a variety of resources. 

    Spanish I Dual Enrollment 

    Dual Enrollment: Elementary Spanish I (SPAN 1010) 

    This course is an Introduction to the Spanish Language. It addresses the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing and develops an appreciation of Hispanic culture. 

    Spanish II 

    Spanish II increases the student’s abilities to communicate in and understand spoken and written Spanish and to further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and understanding of world Spanish/ Hispanic cultures. 

    Spanish II Dual Enrollment  

    Dual Enrollment: Elementary Spanish II (SPAN 1020) 

    This course is a continuation of the study of elementary Spanish with an emphasis on Hispanic culture. 

    Spanish III and Spanish IV 

    These levels are designed for students who have demonstrated outstanding aptitude, interest, and achievement in Spanish as well as the motivation and self-discipline to engage in serious study of the language. The emphasis is on oral and written communication as well as Spanish and Hispanic history and culture. There is also an emphasis on independent work through technology and paired or group work in the texts and other media. 

    Japanese I 

    This course is designed to introduce the student to basic vocabulary, speech patterns,and structures of the Japanese language via the four communicative skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing). The Japanese writing system will be introduced (a combination of hiragana, katakana, and kanji), and students are expected to learn and use hiragana (46 phonetic symbols) and approximately 40 kanji (meaning-based characters). Emphasis is placed on the relationship between vocabulary and language structures and Japanese culture. Comparisons are made between the English and Japanese languages, and American and Japanese cultures. Course content is presented and reinforced through projects, media, and technology. The textbook is supplemented with a variety of resources. 

    Japanese II 

    Japanese II increases the student’s abilities to communicate in and understand spoken and written Japanese and to further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and understanding of Japanese culture. In addition, students will learn and use katakana (46 phonetic symbols) and an additional 17 (or more) kanji. 

     

    Visual and Performing Arts 

    Art I 

    These courses introduce and develop a student’s abilities in the visual arts. The course series begins with a basic study of design and moves toward work involving sketchbooks, calligraphy, print making, painting, sculpture, and personal exhibitions of art. 

    Art II 

    Prerequisite: Teacher approval required 

    The course will explore a broad range of techniques and approaches to art through hand built and wheel thrown clay. Students will learn to approach ceramic artwork as both functional and decorative sculptural objects. Development of technical skills and artistic vocabulary will include scoring, slipping, hand building (slab, coil, and pinch techniques), wheel throwing, bisque firing, slip molding, painting, and glazing, plus the endless alternative possibilities involved with clay. 

    Fine Arts Survey 

    Fine Arts Survey is an overview of the performing and visual arts. Students will learn to identify, analyze, and appreciate the works of master artists within the disciplines – visual art, music, theater, and dance – and form a greater understanding of characteristics associated with various artistic style periods through art history.  This is not a studio course. 

    Media Art I 

    Pathway: Business Management, Arts & A/V Tech, Information Technology, Architecture and Construction 

    Industry Certification: Adobe Certified Associate After Effects & Premiere Pro  

    Dual Enrollment: Introduction to Digital Art (FIAR 1850)  

     Media Art I is a dual-enrollment fine arts course that focuses on time-based media through video graphics and basic principles of animation.  Within a semester, students will learn basics in Photoshop, After Effects (video graphics and animation), Premiere Pro (video editing), and various other programs for creating and recording narration and sound effects in a project-based studio art setting.  

    Media Art II 

    Pathway: Business Management, Arts & A/V Tech, Information Technology 

    Dual Enrollment: Intermediate Digital Art (FIAR 2850)  

    Media Art II takes these basic techniques to a more advanced level, dealing more specifically with creating well-polished and professional video graphics and introducing basic 3-D animation and augmented reality.   

    Dance I 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Dance I consists of the study of dance as a means to understand self and others, to communicate in dramatic form, to study history and culture and to evaluate art. Dance genres may include modern, world dance, ballet, jazz, and social dance. Students have the opportunity to choreograph and present a dance using basic movement. This class may also be considered physical education. 

    Dance II 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Prerequisite:  Dance I 

    Students will perform expanded movement patterns in the different dance genres studied in Dance I. Students will perform dances from various cultures to gain an understanding of cultural, historical, and artistic diversity. Students will also perform dances in different mediums i.e. musical theatre, film and stage. Students will also explore choreographic processes i.e. improvisation, abstraction, retrograde and inversion. 

    Dance III 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Prerequisite:  Dance II and Instructor’s Approval 

    This course stresses the development of strength, flexibility, and endurance of the physical body, the ability of students to work cooperatively with others, and the maturation of performance skills including the range of dynamics, projection and expression. Students explore the craft of choreography and create a dance based on an historical event or theme. Out-of-school rehearsals and performances are required. 

    Dance IV 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Prerequisite:  Dance III and Instructor’s Approval 

     Students will refine kinesthetic and spatial awareness working toward greater musicality and expressiveness. Students will lead various group projects demonstrating sensitivity while working with others.  Students will create original dances, using choreographic processes such as improvisation, thematic development, variation, and resolution. Students will analyze choreography from various cultures as well as create a project illustrating an understanding of historical and cultural contexts. Out-of- school rehearsals and performances are required. 

    Beginning Band and Advanced Band 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    The courses are designed to introduce and supplement knowledge of fundamental principles of musical ensembles. Opportunities are provided to apply skills in learning how to prepare, organize, and rehearse with the ensembles. Through practical assignments, students will gain knowledge of terminology, pedagogy, and structure of various ensembles. Students will read and play music on a daily basis to enhance technique on their particular instrument. Students will also learn and understand the importance of group activities, dedication, and teamwork. Performance opportunities include marching band, concert band, jazz band, and various chamber ensembles. 

    Theatre I 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    This course is a survey of theatrical history, covering the chief characteristics and developmental processes of theatre and musical theatre from ancient Greece to the present. This course includes an introduction to the principles of theatre production and performance. Students enrolling should be comfortable studying texts about theatre as well as presenting scenes and songs in front of the class. Includes opportunities for experiencing live or recorded theatrical performances. 

     Theatre I* - IV’* 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Teacher Approval Required - see Mrs. Cassar to request placement 

    These courses concern the development of fundamental skills in the art of acting in plays and musicals. The student will explore and experience the nature of theatre and musical theatre and the unique performance demands required to create it at an advanced level. Students will present research through analysis of character, script, and lyrics. Students will develop an understanding of, and appreciation for, the craft of acting, dancing, singing and the art of musical theatre. Students view, analyze and perform scenes from a variety of plays and learn the techniques of textual analysis necessary for characterization, and style within the genre. Advanced courses investigate the use of character make-up for a variety of effects for stage, television, and film. This class is co-curricular, requiring student participation in rehearsals, activities and performances both in class and after school. 

    Beginning Choir: Introduction to Performing and Vocal Arts 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    This course is designed to introduce freshmen to the performing arts of theatre, vocal music, and dance. Classwork will prepare students to perform successfully at the high school level in these areas. In this course, students will study works of theatre, music and dance and investigate fundamentals of music theory and literate reading of scripts and music. Literature and repertoire in diverse styles is included. This is the first in a series of courses and is required for advanced electives in theatre and music. 

    Beginning Choir: Introduction to Performing and Vocal Arts, 10-12 grades 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    This course is designed to introduce upperclassmen to the performing arts of theatre, vocal music, and dance. Classwork will prepare students to perform successfully at the high school level in these areas. In this course, students will study works of theatre, music and dance and investigate fundamentals of music theory and literate reading of scripts and music. Literature and repertoire in diverse styles is included. This is the first in a series of courses and is required for advanced electives in theatre and music. 

    Applied Music I*, II*  

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Teacher Approval Required - see Mrs. Cassar to request placement 

    These courses are designed for juniors and seniors to continue the study of the performing arts of vocal music, theatre, and dance. Classwork focuses on solo vocal performance in the classical repertoire and will prepare students to perform successfully at the pre-collegiate and professional level in vocal styles required for classical and musical theatre vocal musicians. This advanced performing art elective provides training in solo performance technique, classical vocal repertoire, and continued study of music theory and history. It is designed as a course to help prepare the high school vocal music performer to transition to a collegiate music environment. Course work is designed for students already mastering basic concepts of introductory music theory and choral performance repertoire, and involves physical activity, singing, and dancing in many styles. Class requirements are co-curricular, requiring student participation in rehearsals, activities, and performances both in class and after school. An audition, fulfillment of the appropriate pre-requisite classes, and assessment of prior student experience is required for students requesting placement in these courses. 

    Small Vocal Ensemble* 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Teacher Approval Required - see Mrs. Cassar to request placement 

    This is a course designed for juniors and seniors to continue study of the performing arts of theatre, vocal music, and dance. Classwork will prepare students to perform successfully at the pre-collegiate and professional level in these areas.This class involves physical activity, singing, and dancing of many styles, and is co-curricular, requiring student participation in rehearsals, activities, and performances both in class and after school. An audition, fulfillment of the appropriate pre-requisite classes, and assessment of prior student experience is required for students requesting placement in these courses. 

    Theatre Design and Technology I 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Theatre Deign and Technology is an overview of backstage theatre. The class will cover concepts from planning of a show to opening night of a production, learning how to use equipment for major theatre productions, and how to present ideas using correct terminology.  

     This class is co-curricular and requires time outside the classroom. 

     Theatre Design and Technology II (Audio Engineering) 

    Pathway: Arts, A/V Technology 

    Industry Certification: Avid ProTools 

     In this course students learn about the physics of sound and the history of recording technologies. They learn about the four stages of professional music recording projects: recording, editing, mixing, and mastering. 

    This class is co-curricular and requires time outside the classroom. 

     

    Physical Education 

    Physical Education I 

    Physical Education I includes an introduction to team and individual sports. The course focuses on individual physical fitness assessments and fitness plans.  This is a graduation requirement. 

    Physical Education II/ Health 

    Physical Education II/Health, required for graduation, emphasizes team and individual sports and physical fitness. The health component encompasses a study in human growth and development, mental and emotional health, safety, substance use and abuse, consumer health, and communicable and non-communicable diseases. 

    Physical Education III, IV and Physical Education Electives 

    These courses offer a variety of advanced team and individual sports training as well as physical fitness training. Nutrition for optimal physical fitness is also emphasized. 

    PE I* and PE II-Health* for Music Theatre students 

    Teacher Approval Required - see Mrs. Cassar to request placement 

    These courses provide intensive training in the integration of the voice and body for the musical theatre performer. Class work will increase physical flexibility and strength, as well as vocal health, power, efficiency, freedom, and develop dance skills, laying the foundation for truthful, imaginative, focused performance in solos, small groups, large ensembles, and productions. These classes involve strenuous activity, dancing of many styles, and are co-curricular, requiring student participation in rehearsals, activities, and performances both in class and after school. An audition, fulfillment of the appropriate pre-requisite classes, and assessment of prior student experience is required for students requesting placement in these courses. These courses are scheduled in the spring semester, and should be paired with fall courses of Beginning Choir at the freshman level, and Theatre I* at the sophomore level. 

     

    Air Force JROTC 

    Participation in Air Force Junior ROTC does NOT obligate students to join the US military. 

    AFJROTC 

    Open to all students, Grades 9-12. AFJROTC is a citizenship program for high school students, grades 9 through 12. Each semester students participate in the AFJROTC wellness-fitness program. Students are encouraged to get involved in their communities to become well-informed, productive citizens. To enhance classroom learning, students can participate in extracurricular and social activities such as field trips, drill teams, color guard, aircraft model and rocketry clubs, and drill meet competitions. All students must wear the AFJROTC uniform on selected days and must meet grooming and appearance standards. 

    JROTC I 

    Leadership Education 100: Traditions, Wellness, and Foundations of Citizenship:  This is an introductory leadership course that introduces cadets to the Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC) program providing a basis for progression through the rest of the AFJROTC program while instilling elements of good citizenship. It covers cadet corps and Air Force organizational structure; uniform wear; customs, courtesies, and other military traditions well as health and wellness and fitness. In this course basic leadership skills are taught and practiced. The course also focuses on Air Force traditions and heritage, self- control, fitness and US citizenship. Students study time management, study skills, teamwork and ethics.  

    JROTC II 

    Prerequisite: Completion of JROTC I 

    Leadership Education 200: Communication, Awareness, and Leadership:  This customized course is designed to improve communication, enhance awareness of self and others, and provide fundamentals of leadership and followership.  The course focuses on the Air Force Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFJROTC) mission to “develop citizens of character dedicated to serving their nation and community”.  Woven throughout the course is the underlying theme of developing personal integrity.  The course also emphasizes leadership and values such as service and excellence.   

    JROTC III 

    Prerequisite: Completion of JROTC II 

    Aerospace Science 100: Milestones in Aviation History:  This is an aviation history course focusing on the development of flight throughout the centuries.  It starts with ancient civilizations, then progresses through time to modern day.  The emphasis is on civilian and military contributions to aviation; the development, modernization, and transformation of the Air Force; and military applications of airpower from World War I to the present.  It is interspersed with concise overviews of the principles of flight to include basic aeronautics, aircraft motion and control, flight power, and rockets. The course also identifies pioneers and people who contributed significantly to both civilian and military aviation.   

    JROTC IV 

    Prerequisite: Completion of JROTC III 

    Aerospace Science 300: Exploring Space: The High Frontier:  This course provides information on human exploration of space, cybersecurity, satellites and their orbits and the International Space Station.  It also includes the study of the early astronomers and the basic interest in the universe from the Greeks through the Renaissance and Enlightenment ages.  Students will be provided and in-depth view of the solar system, including earth, the sun, the moon and planets.  The history of human space travel, NASA, and space probes and robotics will be covered.  The effects of space on the human body, along with history of rockets, launch vehicles and the coordinated systems required for successful space missions will be introduced.     

    JROTC Leadership I 

    Leadership Education 300:  Life Skills and Career Opportunities:   This course provides an essential component of leadership education for today’s high school students. This course it is designed to prepare students for life after high school in the high-tech, globally oriented, and diverse workplace of the 21st century. Students will learn how to become a more confident financial planner and to save, invest, and spend money wisely, as well as how to avoid the credit trap.  Students will discover who they can become by self-assessment to help reveal personal attitudes, aptitudes and personal skills.  Students will be taught how to select education options after high school that is right for them, and how to apply for admission to those educational institutions.  Information will be provided on how to conduct job searches, create resume’s and develop effective interview skills. 

    JRTOC Exploration of Space

    Aerospace 200: The Science of Flight: A Gateway to New Horizons:  During this year cadets will look deeper into the flying environment and focus on how airplanes fly, how weather conditions affect flight, flight and the human body and flight navigation.  Major sections of study are basic aerodynamics and propulsion, weather, aerospace physiology and air navigation.   

    JROTC Leadership II

    Leadership Education 400: Principles of Management:  This course places emphasis on management principles and will tremendously benefit cadets and provide them with the necessary skills and qualities needed to put into practice what they have learned during their time in AFJROTC.  The leadership topics presented will help prepare them to serve in leadership roles within the corps and in applying decision-making techniques, manage, organize, plan and direct the AFJROTC unit.   

    JROTC Global Explorations 

    Aerospace 400: Cultural Studies: An Introduction to Global Awareness:  A Customized course about the world’s cultures.  The course is specifically created to introduce students to the study of world affairs, regional studies, and cultural awareness.  It delves into history, geography, religions, languages, culture, political systems, economics, social issues, environmental concerns, and human rights.  It looks at major events and significant figures that have shaped each region.    relations. Wellness is an important part of the overall program. Proper wear of the Air Force uniform is mandatory. 

      

    Career and Technical Education Course Descriptions 

    Food and Nutrition 

    Pathway: Hospitality and Tourism, Health Sciences 

    Industry Certification: ServSafe Manager 

     The study of the food groups as related to the body functions and dietary requirements is covered. This course covers safe food- handling procedures and microbiological concerns. 

    ProStart I / Dual Enrollment 

    Pathway: Hospitality and Tourism  

    Industry Certification: ProStart National Certificate of Achievement 

    Dual Enrollment credit: Sanitation (CULA 1050)  

     Sponsored by the Louisiana Restaurant Association, ProStart is the career- building program for 11th and 12th grade students who are interested in culinary arts and food service management. This introductory-level cooking skills course covers methods, measurement, vocabulary terms, standard recipes, preparation, and presentations of soups, salads, meats, poultry, fish, vegetables, starches, sandwiches, hors d’oeuvres, breakfast, international cuisine, and baked products. 

    ProStart II 

    Pathway: Hospitality and Tourism  

    Industry Certification: ProStart National Certificate of Achievement 

    Dual Enrollment credit: Basic Food Prep (CULA 1020)  

     Sponsored by the Louisiana Restaurant Association, ProStart is the career- building program for 11th and 12th grade students who are interested in culinary arts and food service management. This course provides students with a basic understanding of the hospitality industry and serves as a foundation for later specialized courses in the food service industry. 

    Horticulture 

    Pathway: None 

    This course includes units in animal science, soil science, plant science, agricultural mechanics, food science technology, and agricultural leadership. Work-based learning strategies appropriate for this course are school-based enterprises, field trips, and internships. 

    Foundations of Education 

    Pathway: Pre-Educator 

    Foundations of Education is an introduction to the practices and challenges facing the modern educator. This course covers the history of education, thoughtful classroom set up and structure, understanding bias and equity, building and maintaining classroom culture, and school governance. Students learn through traditional classroom instruction, speaking with local leaders, and observing elementary, middle, and high school classes in our district. This class is open to anyone who is interested in working with children or exploring education as a career.  

    Multicultural Learning Communities 

    Prerequisite – Foundations of Education 

    Pathway: Pre-Educator 

    In this second education course, students will continue their study of the modern educator and begin to apply the skills learned in the foundation course to an actual classroom. Students will pair with a mentor teacher from either elementary, middle, and high school levels to observe, develop, and teach a lesson. This course ends with the submission of a micro-credential, which acts as a portfolio of work, and provides a great artifact for college applications.  

    ACT Prep 

    Pathway: None 

    This course is designed for students looking to score well on the ACT. Students will learn test-taking strategies, review English, math, reading, and science concepts, take practice tests, and discover ways to reduce test anxiety.  

    CIW Site Development Associate  

    Pathway: Business Management, Arts and A/V Tech, Information Technology 

    Industry Certification: CIW Site Development Associate 

     This course teaches essential Web page development skills. Students learn to develop Web sites using Hypertext Markup Language version 5 (HTML5), Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), write code manually, use graphical user interface (GUI) authoring tools, insert images, create hyperlinks, and adding tables, forms, video, and audio to Web pages. 

    CIW Network Technology Associate I 

    Pathway: Business Management, Arts and A/V Tech, Information Technology 

    Industry Certification: CIW Network Technology Associate 

     This course teaches essential networking technologies and skills, including TCP/IP, stable network creation,  wireless networking,  mobile devices and network troubleshooting. Students learn to use various network components and protocols that enable users to share data quickly, different types of transmission media, how network architecture and topologies provide for efficient and secure communication, OSI reference model and its relationship to packet creation, and compare and contrast the OSI model with the Internet architecture model. 

     CIW Internship 

    Prerequisite: Completion of CIW NTA or SDA 

    Pathway: All 

     CIW Internship is a hands-on class for students who are equipped with finding solutions to everyday technology issues. Students will work around campus ensuring all technology needs are covered at CHS.

     Desktop Publishing 

    Pathway: All 

    Desktop Publishing is designed to help students identify and use desktop publishing technologies. Students determine appropriateness for various tasks and apply concepts of layout and design to publish documents. Digital photography, scanning, and special effects are introduced. Critical thinking and communication skills are reinforced as students’ format, create, and proofread brochures, programs, newsletters, web pages, PowerPoint presentations, and manuscripts. 

    Digital Media I, II 

    Industry Certification: Adobe Certified Associate Photoshop & Illustrator 

    This course introduces students to visual design principles and concepts as applied to digital media-based projects.  Students  focus  learning  on the concepts of Adobe Photoshop. In this hands-on course,  students  learn Photoshop techniques for image development and optimization for various delivery formats, masks, blending modes, alpha channels, and other common Photoshop Techniques 

    Introduction to Engineering 

    This course exposes students to the design process, engineering standards, research and analysis, technical documentation, global and human impacts on communication methods, and teamwork. Using a powerful Computer Aided Design System, students learn the product design process through creating, analyzing, rendering and producing a 3-D model to create solutions to various challenges. 

    Principles of Engineering 

    Prerequisite: Introduction to Engineering Industry Certification: AutoDesk Inventor 

    This is an introductory course that helps students understand the field of engineering, technology, and its career possibilities through the exploration of various technology systems  and  manufacturing  processes. Through the application of math, science, and technology, students will develop engineering problem-solving skills that are implemented in post-secondary education programs and engineering careers. They also learn how engineers address concerns about the social and political consequences of technological change. 

    Introduction to Health Occupations 

    This course introduces students to the world of health care occupations.  It explores the world of work within the medical community, including hospitals, offices, testing facilities, and laboratories. It also acquaints students with opportunities and requirements for employment in each health care profession. 

    Sports Medicine I/II 

    In the Sports Medicine courses, students learn the prevention, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses that occur to athletes and the physically active.

    Psychology  

    Psychology explores behavior and mental processes of both humans and non-human animals. This survey course is an academic discipline that focuses on psychological science and how this body of knowledge can be applied to a variety of issues. Students will  apply critical  thinking  skills and employ various methods of psychological inquiry. Students will study multiple units; some topics include biopsychology, development and learning, cognition, and individual variations.  

    Medical Terminology 

    Dual enrollment course: HSOM 1020 and 1030 (online component) Prerequisites: Biology and ACT composite score of 15 

    Medical terminology is designed for students who have a strong interest in pursuing a career in the medical field. Students are introduced to various medical terms relating to the systems of the human body, diseases, and medical procedures. 

    Certified Clinical Medical Assistant (CCMA) 

     CCMA prepares students to be multi-skilled allied health care professional that specializes in procedures commonly performed in the ambulatory health care setting.

    Students learn clinical and administrative duties, administer injections and medications, take patient vital signs, input electronic health records, and perform EKG, phlebotomy, and laboratory procedures. 

    Enrollment Limited 

    General Technology Education 

    Industry Certification: CITF Core 

    This course is designed as an introductory course into the world of technology and industry. GTE is designed to provide students with basic and varied opportunities in a broad range of topics. Students will design, plan, and build projects using various hand and power tools. 

    Carpentry I  

    Prerequisite: General Technology Education and CITF Core Industry Certification: CITF Level 1 

    The carpentry courses prepares students to construct wood structures for residential and non-residential use. The students learn the safe use of tools, construction protocols, techniques for site layout, blueprint reading, the layout and cutting of framing members, materials estimation, and interior and exterior finishing techniques. 

    Carpentry II  

    Prerequisite: Carpentry I and CITF Level 1 Certification Industry Certification: CITF Level 2 

    The carpentry courses will prepare students to construct wood structures for residential and non-residential use. The students learn the safe use of tools, construction protocols, techniques for site layout, blueprint reading, the layout and cutting of framing members, materials estimation, and interior and exterior finishing techniques. 

    Basic Technical  Drafting  (CAD)  

    Prerequisite: General Technology Education Industry Certification: AutoCAD 

    Basic technical drafting is designed to give students a general overview   of concepts that are common to the broad field of technical drawing. The curriculum is based in the use AutoCAD as its main vehicle of producing drawings. 

    Advanced Technical Drafting (AutoCAD II)  

    Prerequisite: Basic Technical Drafting Industry Certification: AutoCAD 

    Architectural Drafting is designed to give students an overview of the basic concepts that are common in the area of residential planning and design. The steps in planning will enable students to design a residence to meet given specifications. 

    Creative Writing 

    Prerequisite:  English III 

    Creative Writing gives students the opportunity to develop their own writing identities through a series of writing workshops. In each recursive writing workshop, students experiment with a variety of creative strategies, study writers’ craft in diverse exemplar texts, and collaborate with peers in order to develop an original literary work. Students finish the course by proposing and composing an independent writing project. Students leave with tactics to find inspiration for writing in the world, media, and imagination—and to continue to evolve as writers. 

    Publications I ,II (Yearbook) 

    Prerequisite: Teacher Approval Required 

    Industry Certification: Adobe Certified Associate in inDesign 

    Planning, marketing, photography, writing, design, sales, project management—this course offers a wide range of transferable real-world skills for students as they collaborate to create the school’s yearbook. Students in this course will learn the value of working under deadlines and are required to be present at school functions and special events. Students will communicate through interviews, writing and presenting stories with both photos and words. Yearbook students also spend about 100 hours in computer seat time utilizing cutting-edge technology including design programs, word processing, research and digital photography. Students will collaborate as they individually contribute to a group venture, and think creatively to come up with solutions to problems and create layouts. 

    Television Productions I, II, III 

    This course introduces students to the basics of television production.  The television process, basic shots and some basic editing are covered theoretically and put into practice. 

    These courses introduce students to the basics of television production and then expand and develop the students’ editing and production skills. Students produce packages and programs that air both in  school  and over the parish educational television network. Senior students produce individual videos as a graduation requirement. 

    Introduction  to  Business Computer Applications 

    Industry Certification: OSHA and Microsoft Office Specialist in PowerPoint This course introduces students to basic computer concepts, software applications, and computer systems. It leads to the possibility of IC3 certification, an IBC that certifies basic computer operation skills. It introduces the student to the computer skills needed in courses throughout high school and college. 

    Business  Computer Applications 

    Industry Certification: Microsoft Office Specialist in Word 

    This course acquaints students with the principles associated with information processing. Students study computer concepts, word processing, spreadsheet development, presentation applications, and database management. It satisfies TOPS computer component and can lead to Microsoft Office Specialist certification. 

    Customer Service 

    Industry Certification: NRF Customer Service & Sales 

    This course teaches the knowledge and skills noted as important to successful employment in high-performance companies in the sales and service industries. The course covers four major work areas: products and services, assessing customer needs, educating customers, meeting customer needs and providing ongoing customer support 

    Law Studies 

    This course provides an introduction to law and the American legal system with an emphasis on the judicial branch at the federal and state level,  as well as criminal, civil and constitutional law and legal process and procedure. Additional focus is given to the citizen’s role in lawmaking and the judicial process as well as the extent to which law affects our daily lives. 

    Principles of Business 

    Industry Certification: Various 

    This introductory course provides students with a basic framework for understanding the development and structure of American business, business management and organization, human resources management, marketing, finance and information resources. 

    Speech I 

     Speech I covers three units of study: public speaking, oral interpretation, and debate. In these units, students develop basic public speaking skills, perform interpretations of literary texts, and generate sound arguments and rebuttals. Additionally, students practice speaking extemporaneously on a variety of topics, writing speeches, and researching current social and political issues.

    Cyber Society 

     Cyber Society is a set of liberal arts units designed to introduce students to how the world of cyber affects their lives every day. The skills they learn from these modules will help them be more confident in how they interact with the ever-growing and connected world around them. The modules throughout this course will better prepare students to become educated members of the future cyber workforce.

    Quest for Success 

     Quest for Success is an innovative, new, high school-level, career exploration course designed to prepare all Louisiana graduates for career and life success. The course will help all students to develop essential 21st century workforce skills - the ability to communicate, collaborate, and lead; explore new and exciting careers and industry sectors; and learn about themselves and their interests to successfully navigate high school, postsecondary education, and career pathways.

    Emergency Medical Responder 

    Industry Certification: EMR Certifications 

    This course is designed to provide the student with advanced instruction to improve the quality of emergency medical care rendered to victims of accidents and illnesses. Topics include: anatomy and physiology, disease processes, assessment and patient stabilization, and proper use of equipment. 

     

    DECA 

    Principles of Marketing I (Fall Semester) 

    DE—Work Experience Program / Early Release - (Seniors only) - Requires Coordinator’s  approval 

    Industry Certification: Customer Service 

    This course  is  designed  to  introduce  students  to  basic  foundations and functions of marketing, including business, retailing, management, entrepreneurship, communications, career explorations, and economics. 

    Cooperative Marketing Education (Spring   Semester) 

    DE—Work Experience Program / Early Release - (Seniors only) - Requires Marketing Coordinator’s approval. Prerequisite: Principles of Marketing I Industry Certification: Customer Service 

    Students receive course credit for successful completion of classroom academics in the course in which they are enrolled and on the  job training through this course. Students work under the guidance of a teacher facilitator in collaboration with community members/business representatives who serve as on-the-job trainers. Students are evaluated both in the classroom and on the job. Students are eligible to receive an IBC and a Career Technical Endorsement.